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  • What's Next for women in tenant representation?

    Cushman & Wakefield is committed to driving greater gender equality in the property industry. Tica Hessing, Human Geographer and Tenant Advisor in the Strategic Consulting Team, discusses her passion for tenant representation and why she’s encouraging more women to get involved.
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  • Digital Technology - Big data, rule engines and algorithms

    For a variety of reasons, what can be done with big data has only begun to be explored. Most data is stored on the servers of individual companies, not accessible outside those organisations. 

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  • Digital Technology - Artificial Intelligence

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is often articulated as a computer with the ability to ‘think for itself’ or, at the very least, provide fast and accurate answers and solutions to questions and problems. 

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  • Physical Technology - Robots

    The concept of robots (mostly in human form) has existed for over a century, largely in the confines of science fiction. The truth is robots have surrounded us for decades, in homes, workplaces and alongside us daily. Many of the machines that make modern life easier – washing machines, microwaves, dishwashers, coffee machines, vacuum cleaners – are all robots.

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  • Physical Technology - Drones

    Drones have quickly evolved beyond purely entertainment use as the modern equivalent of a remote controlled helicopter. As battery technology improved, increasing carry capacity and distance, drones became commonplace for mapping and photography applications, which led to a range of commercial applications. 

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  • Physical Technology - Driverless Vehicles

    The promise of driverless vehicles has been met with much excitement, understandably so. The use of the Google car is evidence that these vehicles are not far away. 

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  • Physical Technology - Sensors and Tags

    Essentially, sensors serve the purpose of detecting events or changes and reporting this information to another electronic device. The average mobile phone contains over a dozen sensors, they are also turning lights on as you enter a room, announcing arrival in a store and help with reverse parking.

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  • Five Caltex fuel and convience retail assets to go under the hammer

    Cushman & Wakefield’s July National Investment Sales portfolio auction will take place in Sydney Tuesday 24 July, with five fuel and retail assets across Queensland and New South Wales available for purchase. This auction follows the success of the May portfolio auction, where four childcare centres were sold at strong yields.

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  • Agribusiness Team Joins Cushman & Wakefield

    The Cushman & Wakefield Australian agency business has significantly expanded the range of owner and investor services on offer, with the addition of an Agribusiness team. 

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  • Futurology - Physical Technology - Batteries

    So much of the possibility of the future is reliant on battery technology – smaller, longer lasting, and more powerful. Koomey’s Law states at a fixed computing load, the amount of battery needed will fall by a factor of two every 18 months. This has proven true since 1945.

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  • Futurology - Physical Technology - Computers and Printers

    Despite it being only 25 years since 3.5 inch floppy disks, dial up modems and Atari were mainstream, in terms of technology these now seem prehistoric.

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  • Childcare sector on the rise with five centres up for auction in Sydney

    Cushman & Wakefield’s National Investment Sales May portfolio auction will take place in Sydney on Tuesday 22nd May, with five childcare centres across Queensland and New South Wales up for sale. 

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  • Physical Technology - Phones

    Telephones have come a long way since the days of Alexander Graham Bell. What we hold in our hands now seems almost unimaginable, even to the most fantastic science fiction writer. In 1985, the equivalent of our smartphones was the size of an office, was not mobile, did not have a camera and did not have a microphone – and it cost $35 million – it was known as a supercomputer. Fast forward to today and it is now portable, has an incredible camera, a microphone and costs around $800.

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  • The Retailer - Entertainment

    The focus on ‘Kidult’ consumers shows no signs of slowing, with the emergence in recent years of adult trampolining and obstacle courses. Sydney recently welcomed Holey Moley mini golf bar and its arcade counterpart Archie Brothers and BOUNCE trampoline park and challenge course now has 7 locations across Australia. Timezone Australia is set to open its tenth New South Wales location in Central Park shopping centre Chippendale, on the fringe of the Sydney CBD. 

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  • Melbourne HQ awarded Leesman award

    The physical workplace is rapidly changing, as the where, how and when employees work evolves. Now more than ever, organisations are seeking to understand the impact that the physical workplace and operational models have on employee wellbeing and productivity.

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  • Futurology - The Pace of Technological Change

    The pace of technological change is exponential. There are three ’laws’ of technology that are exhibiting exponential growth – that is, they are doubling in size every 18 to 24 months and have done for decades. The first and most widely cited law is Moore’s Law. This law states that a processor doubles in capacity every two years and has been true since 1970.

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